Tag Archives: Twitter

👽 The Emoji Invasion

A critic labelled the ‘text speak’ of the 1990s as “penmanship for the illiterates” but the latest threat to written English is the emoji, said to be the fastest growing language in the UK. While ‘text speak’ saw words shortened and abbreviated, emojis have replaced text altogether, harking back to the dark ages of cavemen and hieroglyphics, when pictures formed the basis of communication.

The rapid spread of emojis into modern communication has seen a translation company hiring the world’s first emoji translator, a restaurant launched in London with an emoji menu and the recent release of the Emoji Movie in our cinemas. So, where did they come from and is there a place for them in modern communication and technical writing?

🎬 Origins of the Emoji

The emoji first appeared on mobile phones in Japan during the late 1990s to support users’ obsession with images. Shigetaka Kurita, who was working for NTT DoCoMo (the largest mobile-phone operator in Japan), felt digital communication robbed people of the ability to communicate emotion. His answer was the emoji – which comes from the Japanese ‘e’ (絵) meaning “picture” and ‘moji’ (文字) “character”.

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One of the original set of 176 emojis designed by Shigetaka Kurita

The original emojis were black and white, confined to 12 x 12 pixels without much variation. These were based on marks used in weather forecasts and kanji characters, the logographic Chinese characters used in Japanese written language. The first colour emojis appeared in 1999and other mobile carriers started to design their own versions, introducing the smiling yellow faces that we see today.

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Shigetawa Kurita, the 👨‍👩‍👧 father of emojis, felt digital communication robbed people of emotion.

Speaking to the Guardian, Kurita admitted he was surprised at the popularity of emojis. “I didn’t assume that emoji would spread and become so popular internationally,” he said. “I’m surprised at how widespread they have become. Then again, they are universal, so they are useful communication tools that transcend language.”

“I’m surprised at how widespread they have become. Then again, they are universal, so they are useful communication tools that transcend language” – Shigetaka Kurita.

However, Kurita doesn’t believe emojis will threaten the written word. “I don’t accept that the use of emoji is a sign that people are losing the ability to communicate with words, or that they have a limited vocabulary,” he said. “Some people said the same about anime and manga, but those fears were never realised (…) Emoji have grown because they meet a need among mobile phone users. I accept that it’s difficult to use emoji to express complicated or nuanced feelings, but they are great for getting the general message across.”

💹 Emojis in Marketing

It is this ability to get the message across very simply that has resulted in companies using emojis more and more in marketing, particularly on platforms like Twitter and via email. It has become a way for brands to humanise themselves, have a sense of humour or put across a message that a younger audience can relate to.

One example of emoji marketing is a Tweet sent by Budweiser which was composed entirely of emojis to celebrate the 4th July this year:

Meanwhile, Twentieth Century Fox took emoji-based humour to whole new level with posters and billboards bearing two emojis and a letter (💀💩L) to announce the release of Deadpool in 2016:

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✍️ Emojis in Technical Writing

A number of tech companies, especially those with a younger (in their 20s-40s) target audience like Slack and Emoji, have also embraced the use of emojis in their technical documentation and the software itself.

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Slack use them sporadically in the product, often as the punchline of a joke or message when you’ve read all unread threads (see screenshot above).

Emojis also appear in their help system, with Emoji flags for the chosen language and to highlight bullet points (see below):

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Startup bank Monzo also embraced emojis early on, designing an emoji-rich interface that would a younger client base than typical banks could relate to. Emojis are automatically assigned to transactions and you’ll find them incorporated in the Monzo API documentation and the app’s Help screen:

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Speaking to brand consultants Wolf Olins, CEO Tom Blomfield explained how they also use machine learning to pair your transaction’s spending category with relevant emoji. For example, it will display the donut emoji 🍩 when you shop at Dunkin Donuts. He said: “There’s no business case for the emoji donut, but people get ecstatically happy when seeing it and go on social media to share the moment.”

☠️ Risks of using Emojis

While emojis might work for some tech companies and give them a way to humanise their brand and relate to their target audience. I think there are several risks which come with their use as well.

The first risk is alienating users who don’t relate to emojis, or even dislike them. Although most of my office do use them as a way to react to each others’ Slack posts etc, there are a number of people who refuse and as there are a lot of nationalities with different cultural references, sometimes the emojis are used in different ways. For example, in Japan the poop emoji (💩) is used for luck while the English use is a lot more literal. Similarly, the folded hands emoji (🙏) means ‘thank you’ in Japan, while it is more commonly used to convey praying or saying ‘please’ in English usage.

Secondly, if emojis are just a fad like the Kardashians, Pokémon GO and Tamagotchi then you face the unpleasant task of replacing them all when they become unpopular, are considering annoying or are phased out. If you have saturated both your product and documentation with emojis then this task will take you and your team a lot of time and effort.

Thirdly and finally, studies have shown that emojis can get lost in translation as they are incredibly subjective so the meaning and intended emotive message can often be misinterpreted. This has continued to get more and more muddled as different vendors and browsers redesign and create their own versions of the unicode emoji characters. A study by GroupLens research lab found evidence of misinterpretation from emoji-based communication, often stemming from emojis appearing differently on different platforms.

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The grimace emoji (😬) is said to cause the most confusion, with researchers finding that 70% of people believed it to be a negative reaction while 30% thought it conveyed a position emotion.

On the whole I don’t dislike emojis or think they’re a threat to the written word. They definitely have a role to play in social interaction, can humanise communication and even add humour to it. However, I still feel there are too many risks, too many different cultural interpretations which mean they simply won’t work in a multinational business. Technical writing is all about choosing the clearest form of communication, the shortest, most simple words that cannot be misunderstood. I’m just not convinced there’s a place for emojis in documentation yet, at least not while there is still room for things to get lost in translation.

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The Role of Text in UX

As software and apps become more user-friendly and commonly-used icons become universally understood, there is a growing tendency to scrap text.

Microsoft experimented with the minimalist icons-over-text approach in their release of Outlook 1997. As you can see from the toolbar, they left out the text descriptions and as a result non-experienced Outlook users apparently stopped using the toolbar altogether:

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Microsoft Outlook 1997
Several designs later, with Outlook 2000, they had a rethink and text was added back in:

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Microsoft Outlook 2000
While more recent designs are less icon-assisted and text has even clearer prominence:

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Microsoft Outlook 2013

Digital designer Thomas Byttebier makes some excellent points about the importance of using text in his blog here, with the concluding statement being “when in doubt, the best icon is a text label.” He lists a number of extremely popular apps and sites where icons are pretty ambiguous. Take Instagram and Spotify for example. Are people aware of what this icon actually does?

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In both cases this in-tray icon is for accessing your inbox and sending direct messages but I think the messaging feature is clearly overlooked in both applications. When I asked friends who have been using the applications for several years whether they were aware of the messaging feature they just looked at me blankly. One said “Oh, that bikini thing”, the other thought it was a basket. So there’s clearly a lack of clarity over the  purpose of the icon but whether that’s due to the ambiguous design or a lack of need, I’m not sure. It’s probably a bit of both.

Twitter have also had some issues with ambiguous and non-universal icons, often presuming that users will just intuitively understand what the icons do and sometimes getting it wrong. As a result Twitter’s user growth has actually slowed as new users that are attracted to the site often have a hard time catching on to how it works.

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The arrow icon for ‘Reply’, the envelope icon for ‘Message’ and the ellipsis (three dots) ‘More Options’ icon are recognisable but the heart icon for ‘Like’ will only be familiar with people who have used Instagram and other social media. A new user is unlikely to know what the ‘Retweet’ icon does unless they are familiar with Twitter’s basic concepts. It is interesting to note that Twitter have added text labels to the bottom five icons (highlighted in green in the image above) because other than perhaps ‘Messages’ their function is not obvious to the user.

While documentation is sometimes seen as an afterthought in the development process, in my opinion the text and written content is an inherent part of user experience for all software, no matter how intuitive the UI designer thinks his icons are or user-friendly the product is. If you want to avoid ambiguity, text will always be the best way to get the message across to the user.

10 Tips for making Content more Engaging

I’ve always liked to learn new bits of software by trial and error, trying things out for myself first and learning from my mistakes but there’s only so far you can get before you get stuck. This is why documentation and help are so invaluable because a piece of software is worthless unless you know how it works.

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In today’s fast-paced world, people don’t have time to read chunky 900 to 1000 page manuals, they want information to be quick and accessible. As a result, technology companies and their technical writers are having to adapt their techniques and content strategies to make documentation more exciting and engaging for readers.

Here are some of the best ways to keep people interested in your content:

1. Pictures

As you have probably seen from my blogs, I am a real advocate for using good images to break up text and make documentation more approachable and more visually interesting.

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This is just the Firefox help homepage but as I mention in my blog last week, I thought the design and use of imagery was really visually appealing.

2. Videos

Taking this approach one step further, videos are another brilliant and effective way to engage help users as long as they are well put together, short and succinct.

The example above is one of Skype’s excellent video tutorials which are really well produced.

Videos can be made with software such as Camtasia or free tools such as Open Broadcaster Software.

3. Gifs

Like videos, it is possible to add gifs to make your content more dynamic and visually interesting. They are a quick simple way to show an example of how something is done:

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This gif was produced using free open-source software called ScreenToGif.

4. Infographics

I think graphics are a great way to get a lot of information across to your readers in one image if they are designed well.

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The Spotify infographic above has 10 separate facts spread across one image.

5. Examples

Using examples is the best way to show your readers what you are trying to explain.

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On the page above, taken from the Twitter, the help describes how to embed a Tweet and then gives examples.

6. Be Human

Use an informal or conversational writing style. Write as if you were describing how the software works to a friend. Readers won’t engage with a robotic tone of voice.

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Linkedin’s Help addresses users by their first name to make the experience more personal.

7. Keep it Short

Don’t overwrite. If you can explain it in one sentence then write one sentence. It’s better to use 25 words rather than 250. The shorter the better.

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Facebook’s Help Centre covers the login basics in just 73 words (and three links).

8. Keep it Simple

Don’t use lengthy words the average person won’t understand or that will get lost in translation. Go with “move in a circle” rather than “circumbilivagination” or “use” instead of “utilise”.

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Sorry Royal Mail but I really dislike the use of “utilise”, it’s just a waste of four letters!

9. Easy Navigation

If your help system is easy to work your way around then people will want to use it.

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Skype’s Help is really easy to navigate from my experience. You can check it out here.

10. Make it fun!

Use humour and unusual text to catch people’s attention. This is discussed by Mozilla’s Michael Verdi in his presentation How To Write Awesome Documentation.

Atlassian Confluence’s help system, shown below, encourages new users to join a fictional space program and complete a mission:

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Sure, it’s a bit wacky and off-the-wall but its fun, it catches attention and keeps readers interested and engaged.

Help Review – Twitter

My stepmum recently asked for help publicising something online and my first suggestion was Twitter but explaining how to use it was a challenge in itself. Although it’s been around for a decade, I still don’t think it is that intuitive for someone who is unfamiliar with the basic concepts and terminology. As a result, the help is vital in explaining how to use it, what Tweets and Retweets are and the importance of followers.

Twitter’s Help link can be found by left-clicking your profile picture and scrolling down to the word Help or by clicking Help in the bottom dashboard.

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First Impressions

The help homepage is pretty stylish, with a prominent white search panel where users can search for what they’re looking for. Underneath there are six key headings for commonly asked questions and even further down there are further sub-headings, a video tutorial and trending topics. Right at the bottom of the page there is an footer with some Quentin Blake-style cartoon people, presumably a hapless user and some friendly Twitter support staff in their Twitter-Blue uniforms. All very quaint but slightly disjointed if you compare the style of the trendy header with the children’s book illustrations in the footer.

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Just testing it out as a “new” user to get to grips with the basics, there is the ‘Using Twitter’ section which introduces to the general concepts and there is a useful ‘Getting started with Twitter’ page, along with a glossary which even experienced users might find useful.

Features

The Twitter Support account is a great little feature. By creating a support account in their own social networking service, it not only encourages user engagement but the process turning to help becomes a seamless part of the Twitter user experience. It’s very neat.

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Commonly asked questions were mostly account-related, either being locked out or wanting to deactivate an account. For more complex issues that require assistance or intervention, the Twitter staff ask users to log a support case, referring them to this page here.

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There is a nice and simple video tutorial about how to mute or block users featuring the same Quentin Blake cartoons. It is nicely put together but I think it’s a shame there aren’t more of these, like a bank of different tutorial videos. The only example I could find on the help site was how to mute a person on Twitter (I’m guessing this was the most commonly asked question the support team were asked):

I checked Twitter’s YouTube channel and there is a slightly longer version of this video, detailing how to block and report users but that was all. I think they’ve missed a trick here but I guess any answered questions can be Tweeted to their support account.

Hidden Features

It’s not so much a hidden feature but something I didn’t know about are the Twitter keyboard shortcuts. This list can be accessed by clicking on your profile picture and clicking Keyboard Shortcuts on the menu.

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Another neat trick is the ability to embed Tweets. This can be done by either clicking the   ••• More (ellipsis) icon and selecting Copy Link to Tweet or Embed Tweet.

It’s quite a nice way to enhance content on a webpage. News sites in particular use this feature as a way to embed quotes from people, normally famous people or politicians, who have written something newsworthy on Twitter.

Conclusion

While it has some cool features, I would have thought Twitter could have added some more innovative aspects to their help, videos or maybe Vines in particular. I think the Twitter Support account is a good idea and it’s clearly being used quite actively. However, this could also be an indication that not enough people are using the help. Additional videos on recovering passwords, unblocking an account and deactivating accounts and sharing them on their Support account would probably halve the number of Tweets they receive. Despite this, I did like the style of the documentation itself, the familiar cartoon illustrations make it approachable and the content itself is a happy medium between informal and informative.