Tag Archives: English Langauge

👽 The Emoji Invasion

A critic labelled the ‘text speak’ of the 1990s as “penmanship for the illiterates” but the latest threat to written English is the emoji, said to be the fastest growing language in the UK. While ‘text speak’ saw words shortened and abbreviated, emojis have replaced text altogether, harking back to the dark ages of cavemen and hieroglyphics, when pictures formed the basis of communication.

The rapid spread of emojis into modern communication has seen a translation company hiring the world’s first emoji translator, a restaurant launched in London with an emoji menu and the recent release of the Emoji Movie in our cinemas. So, where did they come from and is there a place for them in modern communication and technical writing?

🎬 Origins of the Emoji

The emoji first appeared on mobile phones in Japan during the late 1990s to support users’ obsession with images. Shigetaka Kurita, who was working for NTT DoCoMo (the largest mobile-phone operator in Japan), felt digital communication robbed people of the ability to communicate emotion. His answer was the emoji – which comes from the Japanese ‘e’ (絵) meaning “picture” and ‘moji’ (文字) “character”.

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One of the original set of 176 emojis designed by Shigetaka Kurita

The original emojis were black and white, confined to 12 x 12 pixels without much variation. These were based on marks used in weather forecasts and kanji characters, the logographic Chinese characters used in Japanese written language. The first colour emojis appeared in 1999and other mobile carriers started to design their own versions, introducing the smiling yellow faces that we see today.

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Shigetawa Kurita, the 👨‍👩‍👧 father of emojis, felt digital communication robbed people of emotion.

Speaking to the Guardian, Kurita admitted he was surprised at the popularity of emojis. “I didn’t assume that emoji would spread and become so popular internationally,” he said. “I’m surprised at how widespread they have become. Then again, they are universal, so they are useful communication tools that transcend language.”

“I’m surprised at how widespread they have become. Then again, they are universal, so they are useful communication tools that transcend language” – Shigetaka Kurita.

However, Kurita doesn’t believe emojis will threaten the written word. “I don’t accept that the use of emoji is a sign that people are losing the ability to communicate with words, or that they have a limited vocabulary,” he said. “Some people said the same about anime and manga, but those fears were never realised (…) Emoji have grown because they meet a need among mobile phone users. I accept that it’s difficult to use emoji to express complicated or nuanced feelings, but they are great for getting the general message across.”

💹 Emojis in Marketing

It is this ability to get the message across very simply that has resulted in companies using emojis more and more in marketing, particularly on platforms like Twitter and via email. It has become a way for brands to humanise themselves, have a sense of humour or put across a message that a younger audience can relate to.

One example of emoji marketing is a Tweet sent by Budweiser which was composed entirely of emojis to celebrate the 4th July this year:

Meanwhile, Twentieth Century Fox took emoji-based humour to whole new level with posters and billboards bearing two emojis and a letter (💀💩L) to announce the release of Deadpool in 2016:

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✍️ Emojis in Technical Writing

A number of tech companies, especially those with a younger (in their 20s-40s) target audience like Slack and Emoji, have also embraced the use of emojis in their technical documentation and the software itself.

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Slack use them sporadically in the product, often as the punchline of a joke or message when you’ve read all unread threads (see screenshot above).

Emojis also appear in their help system, with Emoji flags for the chosen language and to highlight bullet points (see below):

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Startup bank Monzo also embraced emojis early on, designing an emoji-rich interface that would a younger client base than typical banks could relate to. Emojis are automatically assigned to transactions and you’ll find them incorporated in the Monzo API documentation and the app’s Help screen:

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Speaking to brand consultants Wolf Olins, CEO Tom Blomfield explained how they also use machine learning to pair your transaction’s spending category with relevant emoji. For example, it will display the donut emoji 🍩 when you shop at Dunkin Donuts. He said: “There’s no business case for the emoji donut, but people get ecstatically happy when seeing it and go on social media to share the moment.”

☠️ Risks of using Emojis

While emojis might work for some tech companies and give them a way to humanise their brand and relate to their target audience. I think there are several risks which come with their use as well.

The first risk is alienating users who don’t relate to emojis, or even dislike them. Although most of my office do use them as a way to react to each others’ Slack posts etc, there are a number of people who refuse and as there are a lot of nationalities with different cultural references, sometimes the emojis are used in different ways. For example, in Japan the poop emoji (💩) is used for luck while the English use is a lot more literal. Similarly, the folded hands emoji (🙏) means ‘thank you’ in Japan, while it is more commonly used to convey praying or saying ‘please’ in English usage.

Secondly, if emojis are just a fad like the Kardashians, Pokémon GO and Tamagotchi then you face the unpleasant task of replacing them all when they become unpopular, are considering annoying or are phased out. If you have saturated both your product and documentation with emojis then this task will take you and your team a lot of time and effort.

Thirdly and finally, studies have shown that emojis can get lost in translation as they are incredibly subjective so the meaning and intended emotive message can often be misinterpreted. This has continued to get more and more muddled as different vendors and browsers redesign and create their own versions of the unicode emoji characters. A study by GroupLens research lab found evidence of misinterpretation from emoji-based communication, often stemming from emojis appearing differently on different platforms.

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The grimace emoji (😬) is said to cause the most confusion, with researchers finding that 70% of people believed it to be a negative reaction while 30% thought it conveyed a position emotion.

On the whole I don’t dislike emojis or think they’re a threat to the written word. They definitely have a role to play in social interaction, can humanise communication and even add humour to it. However, I still feel there are too many risks, too many different cultural interpretations which mean they simply won’t work in a multinational business. Technical writing is all about choosing the clearest form of communication, the shortest, most simple words that cannot be misunderstood. I’m just not convinced there’s a place for emojis in documentation yet, at least not while there is still room for things to get lost in translation.

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Debugging the word ‘Bug’

Etymology and the origin of English language have always fascinated me; partly because so many of the words we use every day represent remnants of history; artefacts left behind by the Roman Empire, the Vikings and the Norman conquest. Although words relating to computers and technology are often much younger, some are just as quirky and steeped in history as those from the past.

Like a Moth to a Flame

The origin of the word ‘bug’ in the computing world is often mistakenly credited to computer scientist Grace Hopper. The story goes that while working on the Harvard Mark II computer in 1947 she discovered a dead moth stuck in a relay. It was removed and taped into a logbook where she wrote “First actual case of a bug being found” (see picture below), which suggests that the term was already in use at that time.

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While this might have been the first literal case of ‘debugging’, there is evidence that ‘bug’ had been used in engineering for many years before that.

Scarecrows, Bugs and Bogeys

The most accepted origin of ‘bug’ is the Middle English word ‘bugge’ or ‘bogge’ (n.), which meant a scarecrow or a scary thing. One of the first iterations of the word came in John Wycliffe’s English translation of the bible (circa 1320-1382): “As a bugge either a man of raggis in a place where gourdis wexen kepith no thing, so ben her goddis of tree.” (As a scarecrow or a man of rags in a place where gourds grow guards nothing, so are their gods of wood.)

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‘Bugge’ (n) originally meant scarecrow then became an early name for bedbug.

As language evolved, another off-shoot of ‘bugge’, the scarecrow, was ‘bogey’, an evil or mischievous spirit. This gave rise to a family of other ghost and hobgoblin names including ‘bogeyman’, ‘boggart’, ‘bogle’ and ‘bugaboo’. While the archaic form of ‘bugbear’ is also another hobgoblin figure. In general these all have the same negative connotation of things to avoid and that cause fear or irritation. The direct descendant of these words is ‘bogey’ which still survives today in modern English, in aviation where a ‘bogey’ is an enemy aircraft, in golf where a ‘bogey’ is one over par (a bad score) and a ‘bogey’ (UK) or ‘booger’ (US) is a piece of nasal mucus.

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By the middle of the seventeenth century, the word ‘bug’ no longer meant scarecrow and had come to mean ‘insect’, which makes sense as many people consider them to be alien and scary. The earliest references to ‘bugs’ meaning insects often related to ‘bedbugs’, supposedly because when someone woke up covered in bedbug bites, it was as if they had been visited by something scary during the night.

Thomas Edison’s Bugs

By the 1870s, the meaning of bug had changed once more and perhaps made its first appearance in technology when American inventor Thomas Edison referred to what he called a ‘bug’ while developing a quadruplex telegraph system in 1873. He also mentioned ‘bugs’ in a letter to an associate:

“It has been just so in all of my inventions. The first step is an intuition, and comes with a burst, then difficulties arise — this thing gives out and [it is] then that “bugs” — as such little faults and difficulties are called — show themselves and months of intense watching, study and labor are requisite before commercial success or failure is certainly reached.”

They were mentioned once again in an article in the Pall Mall Gazette in 1889:

“Mr. Edison, I was informed, had been up the two previous nights discovering ‘a bug’ in his phonograph – an expression for solving a difficulty, and implying that some imaginary insect has secreted itself inside and is causing all the trouble.”

Another early example of ‘bugs’ being used to refer to technology was with the release of the first mechanical pinball machine, Baffle Ball, which was created by David Gottlieb in 1931. It was advertised with the strap-line “No bugs in this game!” (see poster below):

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So it seems fair to assume that the word ‘bug’ came from ‘bugge’, the Middle English for scarecrow, which led to ‘bogey’ and all the similar words meaning an obstacle, a source of dread or something to be feared. In modern times the word ‘bug’ has become a verb meaning to vex or irritate, while the noun form has become a synonym for disease-causing germs, crazily enthusiastic or obsessive people (e.g. a firebug is a pyromaniac), concealed recording devices used by spies and perhaps, thanks to Edison, an error in technology.

 

 

 

Funny Typos & Spelling Mistakes

We all make mistakes every now and then. Sometimes they are made by the developers, sometimes they are made by the technical authors or content writers. Here are a few examples of unfortunate typos which serve as a funny reminder to always double-check your copy before it is released!

1. The existential crisis. Are you sure you want to exist?
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Credit to Reddit user /u/psychob

2. Shit happens. A really unfortunate misspelling of shoot by Pentax.

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3. Beyond parody. British Government announces new language test for migrants with an embarrassing misspelling.

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One of the first people to spot the mistake was Nick Wallis from BBC’s The One Show:

4. Child’s Play: It’s important to know the difference between “they’re” and “their”.

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5. Regsiter? Nah, I think I’ll register with a company which doesn’t make spelling mistakes.

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6. Reeding between the lines: I don’t think this Yellow Pages advert was proofread.

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As the examples above show, we’re all human and mistakes do happen but they may cost your website, business or documentation their credibility and sometimes money. Always double-check your copy before publishing it.