Tag Archives: Design

UX Design: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

The Good

One of the nicest pieces of UX design I’ve come across recently is the Monzo banking app. When a friend from university said he was part of team setting up a bank it piqued my interest, partly because it sounded so ambitious and partly because I worked in the payment industry at the time.

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Founded in 2015 as Mondo before a legal dispute forced them to change the name, they are part of the new crop of so-called “challenger banks”, set up to battle the old guard of banking institutions who are losing touch with their customers, the smartphone generation in particular.

Their USP is that Monzo is built with the latest modern technology (developed in Google’s coding language Go) so is “as smart as your phone”, easy to use and is able to offer instant notifications when payments are made.

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spending

It’s difficult to convey how nice the UX is in a still image but the app is incredibly clean and intuitive and makes it a fun way to map your spending. As you make purchases on your Monzo card they appear instantly in your app where you can see the name of the merchant, the amount spent, as well as map location, the category that your purchase fits into (entertainment, transport, groceries etc) and it is possible to attach a receipt and a note, completed with emojis. Overall, it’s just a very pleasing app to use.

The Bad

One my tasks at work is to send out version releases and patches using a piece of software called BizWizard which is made in Sweden. I’m going to be brutally honest, the old version of the product really sucked and I dreaded using it because I had so many issues with it.

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For starters, it wouldn’t run on Google Chrome and would crash unless running with Edge or Firefox.  I also found that most of my time on Bizwizard seemed to be spent watching the same grey progress bar as it slowly moved from screen to screen:

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I thought it might be related to the amount of messages being stored but it is slow to navigate between most screens, even those without much data. It just made the entire experience of using it very dull and frustrating.

I’m not going to be totally negative about Bizwizard because the latest version is a dramatic improvement and for the most part, it’s really easy to use. I just encountered one more issue that I didn’t like in the new version of the content editor, which is that when I finished writing a message, my natural inclination was to click the prominent blue Revert button at the bottom of the screen, assuming that was the Save button (See screenshot below):

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The Revert button which tricked me into thinking it was a Save button in BizWizard.

It’s probably a result of using Confluence, where the Save button is in the button right (see below), but as a result of clicking Revert my text was wiped with no way to undo or get it back. Very frustrating as a first time user of the new version.

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The Save button in Atlassian Confluence.

I suppose I can’t be too hard on BizWizard for creating a button in a similar style and position to Confluence but it shouldn’t have so much prominence because it is a more natural place for a Save button. I’ve sent my feedback to them so it’s up to them whether they change it or not.

The Ugly

Linkedin is actually an app I use quite a lot and occasionally use to share my blog posts but unfortunately there are quite a few things I don’t like about it and the overall experience.

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Apart from the feeling that the “professional network” is striving to turn itself into Facebook and forever tries to force connections on you, there are other things that annoy me and just make it an unpleasant and sometimes annoying user experience.

Take the homepage for example, there is just so much going on. It’s just a bit of an information overload and makes me want to close it down. See screenshot below:

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There are so many things that demand your attention here in my opinion, with the orange warning bar about emails at the top, the yellow button begging to be pressed so I can reconnect with colleagues (not today thanks), blue links encouraging me to improve my profile and grow my network, an advert asking me to try Hired today, and a tab informing me I have one new update (and that’s having already read my notifications). It’s just far too much, like a needy kid screaming for attention, a lot of it just unnecessary and off-putting. It ruins the user experience.

In contrast, the smartphone app version is actually really nice to use and much cleaner than the web version. It’s a much more enjoyable user experience with a nicely designed UI and much less information to deal with. See screen below:

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The only negative is the red notifications are often unclear so I don’t always know what I’m getting notifications for and there still seems to be an ongoing issue with messages/emails,  for example receiving and sending duplicates of the same message.

As a technical author I do find myself looking at software and applications through the eyes of a first time user/ tester so I’m maybe I’m being harsh with my criticism but development teams should always consider the user, their experience and how they would expect or like your product to work. If your product doesn’t work how they would expect it to, if they find it difficult to navigate or if they find the overall experience annoying or frustrating then they are unlikely to want to use it again and that’s bad news for business.

Please note: User experience is always going to be subjective so some people may agree or disagree with me about these examples. It goes without saying that all of the opinions above are my own and not those of my employer!

The Origin of the Hamburger and Other Icons

The emergence of the three-lined “Hamburger” menu icon in modern interface design was so fast I had just assumed it was a relatively new creation. However, after a bit of research I discovered its origins were far more rooted in the history of technology than I first thought. It was software designer Geoff Alday who made the discovery, which he wrote about in this blog post, learning that icon was first used back in the early 1980s on the interface of the Xerox Star work-machine, one of the grandfathers of the modern personal computer. You can see it shown in the middle of the screenshot from 1981 below:

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A bit-mapped screenshot from the Xerox Star workstation released in 1981.

Norman Cox, the designer behind the icon, said its design was meant to be “road sign” simple, functionally memorable, and mimic the look of the resulting displayed menu list. Cox later told the BBC it was jokingly referred to as the “air vent” icon. He said: “At Xerox we used to joke with our initial users that it was an ‘air vent to keep the window cool’. This usually got a chuckle, and made the symbol more memorable and friendly.”

“At Xerox we used to joke with our initial users that it was an ‘air vent to keep the window cool’. This usually got a chuckle, and made the symbol more memorable and friendly” – Norm Cox, former Xerox designer

The icon didn’t really appear for nearly 30 years until it was adopted as a menu icon by social networking site Path, which launched in 2010, and then later Facebook and Apple iOS applications, meeting a growing need for more content to fit onto smaller smartphone screens via the use of menus. It has since become widely-accepted as a menu icon by UI designers and can found everywhere from web browsers Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox, to news websites such as the BBC and others.

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2016-07-08 13_51_08-Home - BBC News

2016-07-15 14_53_20-News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition _ The Guardian

After some more research I soon discovered that there were a number of other prominent icons and symbols still used today that first emerged in the 1980s. Apart from the ‘Hamburger’ icon, Norman Cox is also attributed with creating the document icon, which was another part of the Xerox Star interface. This image here shows the design development. After Cox, one of the most prolific designers of the 1980s was Susan Kare who worked for Apple Macintosh. Descendants of her early designs that still exist today include icons such as the lasso, the grabber, and the paint bucket. You can see some other the examples of her work in the screenshot below:

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A selection of designs by Apple Macintosh designer Susan Kare.

She also came up with the command key design (⌘) that still appears today on most Apple keyboards. Kare apparently discovered it while browsing through a symbol dictionary and found it was commonly used on signposts in Scandinavian countries to mark places of interest. When asked by MacFormat magazine about the longevity of her icons she said: “I am very grateful and appreciative that some images I designed almost 30 years ago are still in use. I believe that symbols that are simple – not too many extraneous details – and meaningful can have a long life span.”

Other icons that have survived since the 1980s are shown in the table below:

  Icon  Name  Designer/Creator
menu-alt-512 Hamburger icon Norm Cox for Xerox Star.
ios7-document-icon Document icon Norm Cox for Xerox Star.
command-symbol_318-74882 Command icon Susan Kare for Apple Macintosh.
Susan-Kare-fill-icon-660x660 Fill icon Susan Kare for Apple Macintosh.
mouse-cursor-icon Mouse icon* Douglas Englebart for Xerox PARC
common-search-lookup-glyph-128 Search icon  Keith Ohlfs for NeXT Inc.

*The mouse cursor arrow originally pointed upwards but because resolution was so low it was easier to draw an arrow at a 45 degree angle.

10 Tips for making Content more Engaging

I’ve always liked to learn new bits of software by trial and error, trying things out for myself first and learning from my mistakes but there’s only so far you can get before you get stuck. This is why documentation and help are so invaluable because a piece of software is worthless unless you know how it works.

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In today’s fast-paced world, people don’t have time to read chunky 900 to 1000 page manuals, they want information to be quick and accessible. As a result, technology companies and their technical writers are having to adapt their techniques and content strategies to make documentation more exciting and engaging for readers.

Here are some of the best ways to keep people interested in your content:

1. Pictures

As you have probably seen from my blogs, I am a real advocate for using good images to break up text and make documentation more approachable and more visually interesting.

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This is just the Firefox help homepage but as I mention in my blog last week, I thought the design and use of imagery was really visually appealing.

2. Videos

Taking this approach one step further, videos are another brilliant and effective way to engage help users as long as they are well put together, short and succinct.

The example above is one of Skype’s excellent video tutorials which are really well produced.

Videos can be made with software such as Camtasia or free tools such as Open Broadcaster Software.

3. Gifs

Like videos, it is possible to add gifs to make your content more dynamic and visually interesting. They are a quick simple way to show an example of how something is done:

Animation

This gif was produced using free open-source software called ScreenToGif.

4. Infographics

I think graphics are a great way to get a lot of information across to your readers in one image if they are designed well.

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The Spotify infographic above has 10 separate facts spread across one image.

5. Examples

Using examples is the best way to show your readers what you are trying to explain.

2016-06-02 14_05_27-Embedding a Tweet on your website or blog _ Twitter Help Center

On the page above, taken from the Twitter, the help describes how to embed a Tweet and then gives examples.

6. Be Human

Use an informal or conversational writing style. Write as if you were describing how the software works to a friend. Readers won’t engage with a robotic tone of voice.

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Linkedin’s Help addresses users by their first name to make the experience more personal.

7. Keep it Short

Don’t overwrite. If you can explain it in one sentence then write one sentence. It’s better to use 25 words rather than 250. The shorter the better.

2016-06-02 14_10_12-Login Basics _ Facebook Help Centre

Facebook’s Help Centre covers the login basics in just 73 words (and three links).

8. Keep it Simple

Don’t use lengthy words the average person won’t understand or that will get lost in translation. Go with “move in a circle” rather than “circumbilivagination” or “use” instead of “utilise”.

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Sorry Royal Mail but I really dislike the use of “utilise”, it’s just a waste of four letters!

9. Easy Navigation

If your help system is easy to work your way around then people will want to use it.

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Skype’s Help is really easy to navigate from my experience. You can check it out here.

10. Make it fun!

Use humour and unusual text to catch people’s attention. This is discussed by Mozilla’s Michael Verdi in his presentation How To Write Awesome Documentation.

Atlassian Confluence’s help system, shown below, encourages new users to join a fictional space program and complete a mission:

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2016-06-01 14_40_57-Tutorial_ Navigate Confluence - Atlassian Documentation

Sure, it’s a bit wacky and off-the-wall but its fun, it catches attention and keeps readers interested and engaged.

Help Review – Mozilla Firefox

I stumbled across Mozilla Firefox’s help system last week and was interested to find most of the articles were largely written by volunteers. I hadn’t come across this kind of model for documentation before so it raised some interesting questions. For starters, can a group of volunteer technical writers collaborate to produce an effective help system?

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Mozilla released Firefox as an open-source web browser back in 2002 and as such the source code is open to anyone. As a non-profit organisation, Mozilla also relied heavily on the code, along with the support and documentation being largely maintained by volunteers. Although the company now has a large workforce of paid employees, an army of volunteers also still contribute to roughly 40% of its work, which includes not only the documentation but also coding tweaks (around 24% of all source code changes) and even the Firefox logo design. The help system was created through the SUMO technical writing program, which invited participants (a mixture of college students and technical writing professionals) to take part in each release cycle in order to produce the documentation. Although the program is not currently active, the participants and other volunteers still seem to be actively involved in maintaining the existing help articles.

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First Impressions

Visually, I think the design and layout of the Mozilla Support homepage is really appealing, with all of the individual products and their logos mapped out in different sections. It just looks cool. The simple grey background, contrasting with the colourful designs of the Mozilla product icons and clearly marked out sections make it very easy to navigate. It was interesting to discover that some of the legacy of Mozilla’s design is down to an interface designer called Steven Garrity wrote an article listing everything that was wrong with Mozilla’s visual identity back in 2003 and was subsequently invited to their head office and asked to head up their new visual identity team which led a re-brand in 2004 when the now well-known Firefox logo, designed by Jon Hicks, was introduced.

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The help is broken down into nine help topics, with multiple articles under each topic. The documentation itself is clearly laid out, although the screenshots are sometimes different sizes and formats (some fade into background, some do not etc.) and it is easy to spot where different technical writers have worked on the same article and used different styles to highlight sections of a screenshot. In the example below, you can see three different contributors’ work, with one opting for a crimson red rectangle to highlight ‘Desktop’, another using a orange-red circle and the third person using a brighter scarlet red oval:

Inconsistent

Each page does actually list the authors of each article so it is possible to see how many people have contributed to each article. This particular article had eight contributors but other have even more, and unfortunately it shows:

2016-05-31 12_31_59-How do I tell if my connection to a website is secure_ _ Firefox Help

In this article, which had 22 contributors, there were little issues like the screenshots being slightly different sizes. While it’s not the end of the world, the different styles of writing and formatting are pretty noticeable, even for someone without mild OCD, and it can look a bit messy and unprofessional. I guess it’s the kind of thing that’s forgivable when you’re using a free open-source browser but it could be easily remedied if Mozilla implemented a style guide for all contributing technical authors to ensure there is more uniformity with terminology, screenshots and how things are highlighted. Alternatively an editor could go through and make edits to clean things up where necessary.

Features

One thing I was really pleased to see in the help was the occasional gif clip and a good number of tutorial videos which ensure the content is dynamic and semi-interactive for its readers. The videos, which have been produced by Mozilla senior UX designer Michael Verdi, are short and well edited so they are very watchable. He has a personal, informal style and friendly tone which is more engaging than a robotic Siri/Cortana-style  narration.

At the top of each article, there is also a drop-down menu on the left-hand side which has some pretty useful features such as a link to any discussion items on the article’s topic, multiple language translations of the article, showing what other articles are linked to the article you are reading and seeing the history of who contributed and edited the article.

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In terms of help and support, it has three main branches: Twitter, a support forum and help articles. Again, this is a great way for Mozilla to keep all of their bases covered. The other great thing people volunteer to assist with all three of those branches as well, with volunteer contributors on Twitter, volunteers answering questions on the support form and volunteers writing the help articles themselves. These volunteers are prompted to help by various Volunteer for Mozilla Support buttons, as shown in the screenshot  below:

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There is constant encouragement to get involved in things like the “Army of Awesome” (their Twitter helpers) and statistics about how help matters. For example, “1 Tweet can save 1 day” and “1 article can be viewed by 400 million users”. It just has a really positive, pro-active community feel about it.

Another common theme is the carton Firefox character, who is like a superhero-type figure, which appeals to everyone’s inner geek. It’s another simple but effective way to make  the support pages fun and engaging.

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Conclusion

I am really impressed with the content and support that is being produced by Mozilla, especially given the high percentage of work being done voluntarily. On top of the written content, they are also managing to offer video tutorial content and a Twitter help account which are further supported by a support forum. It would be useful to have a style guide or some kind of lead technical author/editor to iron out any issues with uniformity but overall I think Firefox’s support pages prove that open source projects can be reasonably well-documented through crowd-sourcing volunteer technical writers. I’m not sure this model of documentation would work for everyone but I think Mozilla have proved that volunteers can collaborate to produce an extensive help system, this clearly isn’t just a big work experience project.